News

01/01/2019

Commercial Drone Deliveries Finally Begin ….. In Ontario, Canada

Residents of a remote First Nation island in northern Ontario will begin receiving goods by drone in 2019. The Moose Cree First Nation has signed a C$2.5m (£1.5m) commercial deal with a drone delivery company to transport supplies, medicine, food and mail from the mainland town of Moosonee. Moose Factory island is only accessible by boat in summer, ice road in winter and helicopter at other times. “It can be challenging transporting goods, especially during this time of year, when the river is freezing,” Moose Cree First Nation spokesman Paul Chakasim told the BBC. “It’s really about trying to service […]
31/12/2018

This Drone Can Change Shape Mid-Flight To Suit Its Environment

In nature, birds have the ability to adapt to different flight conditions and its surroundings. A collaboration between the University of Zurich and EPFL Lausanne has resulted in a foldable morphing quadrotor drone that can change its shape and size to different tasks, for example, to traverse horizontal and vertical gaps whilst inspecting structures or transporting objects allowing it to explore inaccessible environments and help rescuers during their missions. The foldable drone is composed of a mainframe and an intelligent flight controller that enables four independently rotating arms that do not require any symmetry for flight. Equipped to operate independently, […]
29/12/2018

AeroScope: Orchestrating The Sky

With drones rising in popularity to capture photos and video, it’s important to know who’s flying nearby, so we can coordinate with people who are approved and talk to others who may not be,” said Sam Parks, Director of Operations for the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta. Read full article here.
29/12/2018

What Could A Drone Collision Do To An Aeroplane Wing?

Drones can do significantly more damage than bird strikes. How much damage? It depends on what and where. Researchers have been studying various forms of theoretical collisions, including what happens if a drone collides with a plane’s nose cone or gets sucked into its engine. Now, a group of scientists attempted to explore the dangers of a wing collision by recreating one in the lab. Researchers from the University of Dayton loaded a standard recreational drone into a cannon, fired it at a plane wing and observed the carnage that resulted.